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The progressive claim to be the forward thinkers fighting against the atavistic belief-systems of conservatives, mired as they are (allegedly) in the 19th century, flies in the face of the facts.  Progressivism relies on ideals and values that go back much further than the 19th century, to the days of Augstine in the 6th Century, the notion that the State should, by threat of violence, enforce a uniform value system for the good of the whole.  In this context, progressivism is the regessive value system and conservativism is a value system based on revolutionary ideals.  Read the full article to see how progressivism (regressivism) holds more in common with the Spanish Inquisition than it does with the revolutionary founders of this nation:


think regress

Paul Gordon Collier

Why Progressives Should Be Called “Regressives”

 

Progressives have called on a ‘fresh look’ at the bill of rights.  They claim a superior stance of ‘progress’.  They claim to have special knowledge of the progress of man’s understanding of governance that goes beyond the old fashioned, dead notions contained in the bill of rights.  They doubt the primacy of individual rights to governance.  Rather, they argue, it is more important to consider the rights of the collective over the rights of the individual.

We have evolved, they say, and we should change the way we think of rights to reflect this new, deeper, progressive understanding of rights in a nation that has grown in its sophistication to appreciate the collective rights and the guarantees of happiness a state, buoyed by these collective rights, can provide.

The bills of rights themselves are born from the struggle by common men and women to be able to worship as they please.  The debate of individual sovereignty versus collectivist sovereignty came to a head, again and again, in the battles, the martyrdoms of Christians who were murdered by other Christians for not practicing the accepted orthodoxy of whatever state they lived in.

In Geneva of the 1500s, a man could be killed, by the state, for not believing in the Holy Trinity.  In England of the late 1400s a man could be killed, by the state, for continuing to recognize the authority of the Pope.  In Bohemia of the 1400s a man could be killed, by the state, for reading, in his home, a Bible written in his native tongue.

The notion of individual liberty was fought for, through the ages, for the purpose of being able to worship God the way the individual chose.  Again and again, peoples were exterminated, or nearly exterminated for daring to champion the cause of the rights of individuals to come to a personal relationship with God.