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William Collier-

Why did the Egyptian Army overthrow the Muslim Brotherhood?

It was not merely the popular uprising.

Here’s the real truth- The Muslim Brotherhood tried to export its Islamo-fascist revolution.

 

Egyptian Flag

A Muslim Brotherhood plot was uncovered in the United Arab Emirates: 62 coup plotters were captured. Coincedently there was a fire in a government building in the UAE which we suspect was started by these plotters or their agents.

It is possible, even probable, that the coup plotters in the UAE were materially supported by Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood President, Morsi, who wasted billions of dollars promoting his radical fascist agenda rather than deal with Egypt’s economic woes. This development is a virtual act of war against another nation and no doubt the Egyptian Army was not wanting Egypt to be a mere tool for this radical Islamo-fascist group’s agenda, especially as that agenda would lead to the diplomatic isolation of Egypt.

This effort to export the fascist revolution prompted the Saudis, the UAE, Qatar, Bahrain, and Kuwait to assure the Egyptians that if the US cuts aid they’ll match it…and then some. US leadership has been lacking with the President’s emphasis on “democracy” being defined solely by winning elections, not by how governments behave towards their people.

For instance, religious minorities and average people were more free in their personal lives and choices in the UAE, which is a monarchy, then in Egypt under its “democracy”.

While human rights groups are upset about the Egyptian and UAE crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood, others in those nations applaud the suppression of a group that is well known for being a source of violent suppression of its opponents and its imposition of a form of sharia law that most Muslims see as repressive and brutal.

Democracy, it is said, isn’t so much about the vote as it is about the behavior. That, for instance, individuals have more real freedom in their own lives in monarchies such as the UAE or Kuawait than they did under a “democratically elected” government in Egypt was an irony not lost on many in the Middle East.

The upshot of this is that the Egyptian Army is likely to go to war, in a low key way, with the Muslim Brotherhood and to suppress or marginalize Islamo-fascist groups it sees as likely to use “democracy” to gain power and then suppress everyone else’s freedoms.